4 March 2013

  Records 1 to 50 of 245     Next 20 results Last results

LAZY AFTERNOON, late 1980s
LAZY AFTERNOON, late 1980s
Kenneth Webb RWA FRSA RUA (b.1927)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 1

Published Estimate: €6000-8000

Price Realised: €8000

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 24 by 20in., 60 by 50cm.
  • Provenance: James Gallery, Dalkey;Where purchased by the present owner
  • Exhibited: 'Webb at the James', James Gallery, Dublin, June 2001(illustrated p.8 of exhibition catalogue)
  • Literature: Walpole, Josephine, Kenneth Webb, A life in Colour, Antique Collector's Club, Suffolk, 2003, p.199 (referenced), p.120 (full-page colour illustration)
  • A copy of the original exhibition catalogue signed by the artist accompanies this lot.Kenneth Webb, A life in Colour describes the present work thus: Lazy Afternoon shows a group of immaculately painted people sitting on an equally immaculate wall overlooking a traditional shore and sea then, in front, we are faced with a tumultuous riot of massed meadow flowers picked out here and there with a perfectly formed and executed poppy.""

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


MO THOBAC? 1991
MO THOBAC? 1991
Liam O’Neill (b.1954)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 2

Published Estimate: €4000-6000

Price Realised: €4600

  • Signature: signed lower left; signed, titled and dated on reverse; with artist's [Dublin] studio label affixed on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 36 by 24in., 90 by 60cm.
  • Provenance: Purchased directly from the artist by the present owner
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


RACING IN LAYTOWN, COUNTY MEATH
RACING IN LAYTOWN, COUNTY MEATH
Liam O’Neill (b.1954)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 3

Published Estimate: €3000-4000

Price Realised: €2900


SMITHFIELD, DUBLIN
SMITHFIELD, DUBLIN
Kenneth Webb RWA FRSA RUA (b.1927)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 4

Published Estimate: €6000-8000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower right; with title on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 20 by 24in., 50 by 60cm.
  • Provenance: James Gallery, Dalkey;Where purchased by the present owner
  • Exhibited: 'Webb at the James', James Gallery, Dublin, June 2001
  • A copy of the original exhibition catalogue signed by the artist accompanies this lot.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


THE DOWNINGS, COUNTY DONEGAL, 1989
THE DOWNINGS, COUNTY DONEGAL, 1989
Kenneth Webb RWA FRSA RUA (b.1927)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 5

Published Estimate: €2000-2500

Price Realised: €2100


KILSHANNY, COUNTY CORK
KILSHANNY, COUNTY CORK
Kenneth Webb RWA FRSA RUA (b.1927)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 6

Published Estimate: €3000-4000

Price Realised: €2000


FISHING VILLAGE, circa 1950
FISHING VILLAGE, circa 1950
Markey Robinson (1918-1999)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 7

Published Estimate: €8000-12000

Price Realised: €7500

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: gouache on board
  • Dimensions: 20 by 24in., 50 by 60cm.
  • Provenance: with the Eakin Gallery, Belfast, 2003;Private collection, Belfast;Whyte's, 30 April 2007, lot 169;Private collection, Dublin
  • Exhibited: 'Irish Art', Eakin Gallery, 3-18 October 2003, catalogue no. 39 (illustrated in catalogue)
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


NOCTURNAL LANDSCAPE WITH WINDMILL
NOCTURNAL LANDSCAPE WITH WINDMILL
Markey Robinson (1918-1999)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 8

Published Estimate: €6000-8000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower left
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 26 by 36in., 65 by 90cm.
  • Provenance: Fr. Ó Loideáin (Leyden) Mission Antiques, Clarendon St., Dublin;Private collection
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


TWO BLUE TREES, SHAWLIES AND SAILBOATS
TWO BLUE TREES, SHAWLIES AND SAILBOATS
Markey Robinson (1918-1999)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 9

Published Estimate: €4000-6000

Price Realised: €4000

  • Signature: signed lower left
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 22 by 26in., 55 by 65cm.
  • Provenance: Fr. Ó Loideáin (Leyden) Mission Antiques, Clarendon St., Dublin;Private collection
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


SHAWLIE AND SAILBOATS BY THE SHORE
SHAWLIE AND SAILBOATS BY THE SHORE
Markey Robinson (1918-1999)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 10

Published Estimate: €3500-4500

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower left
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 20 by 30in., 50 by 75cm.
  • Provenance: Fr. Ó Loideáin (Leyden) Mission Antiques, Clarendon St., Dublin;Private collection
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


SHAWLIE, COTTAGE & BLUE MOUNTAIN
SHAWLIE, COTTAGE & BLUE MOUNTAIN
Markey Robinson (1918-1999)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 11

Published Estimate: €1800-2000

Price Realised: €2500

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 12 by 18.75in., 30 by 46.875cm.
  • Provenance: Fr. Ó Loideáin (Leyden) Mission Antiques, Clarendon St., Dublin;Private collection
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


THREE COTTAGES AND TREE AGAINST A BLUE MOUNTAIN
THREE COTTAGES AND TREE AGAINST A BLUE MOUNTAIN
Markey Robinson (1918-1999)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 12

Published Estimate: €1500-1800

Price Realised: €1800

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 13 by 18.5in., 32.5 by 46.25cm.
  • Provenance: Fr. Ó Loideáin (Leyden) Mission Antiques, Clarendon St., Dublin;Private collection
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


STILL LIFE WITH JUGS AND BIRDCAGE
STILL LIFE WITH JUGS AND BIRDCAGE
Markey Robinson (1918-1999)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 13

Published Estimate: €1000-1500

Price Realised: €950


NIGHT - KERRY COAST and EVENING LIGHT, CLARE COAST (A PAIR)
NIGHT - KERRY COAST and EVENING LIGHT, CLARE COAST (A PAIR)
Ciarán Clear (1920-2000)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 14

Published Estimate: €1000-1500

Price Realised: €1300

  • Signature: both signed lower left and inscribed with title on reverse;
  • Medium: oil on board; (2)
  • Dimensions: 11.5 by 15.25in., 28.75 by 38.125cm.
  • Dimensions of Evening Light, Clare Coast 5 by 17.5ins.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


POKER SCHOOL
POKER SCHOOL
Robert Taylor Carson HRUA (1919-2008)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 15

Published Estimate: €2000-3000

Price Realised: €2000

  • Signature: signed lower left; inscribed with title on reverse; with stamp of The Gallery, Dunfanaghy on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 15.5 by 22in., 38.75 by 55cm.
  • Provenance: The Gallery, Dunfanaghy, Co. Donegal;Private collection
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


GEORGIAN HOUSES [HARCOURT ST.], DUBLIN, c.1926
GEORGIAN HOUSES [HARCOURT ST.], DUBLIN, c.1926
Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 16

Published Estimate: €5000-7000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower left; with partial inscribed artist's label preserved on reverse
  • Medium: oil on panel
  • Dimensions: 15 by 20in., 37.5 by 50cm.
  • Exhibited: 'The Impressions and Landscape Paintings by Harry A. Kernoff', 7 St. Stephen's Green, Dublin, 20 April to 4 May, 1926, catalogue no. 21 [£6-6-0]
  • The exhibition catalogue for the 1926 show presents this oil between two nocturnal views of Harcourt Street Station and Harcourt Street Corner. 51 Works were exhibited in the show which comprised views of Dublin City and County, Bray, Co. Wicklow and a number of portraits.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


FIGURES BY THE SHORE WITH COTTAGES AND MOUNTAIN BEYOND, ACHILL, COUNTY MAYO
FIGURES BY THE SHORE WITH COTTAGES AND MOUNTAIN BEYOND, ACHILL, COUNTY MAYO
Henry Healy RHA (1909-1982)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 17

Published Estimate: €800-1000

Price Realised: €850


CHAPELIZOD, DUBLIN
CHAPELIZOD, DUBLIN
Henry Healy RHA (1909-1982)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 18

Published Estimate: €800-1000

Price Realised: €0


SCOOTER DUCKS
SCOOTER DUCKS
Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 19

Published Estimate: €6000-8000

Price Realised: €7000

  • Signature: signed lower right; with inscribed Taylor Galleries label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 16 by 20in., 40 by 50cm.
  • Provenance: Taylor Galleries, Dublin;Private collection
  • Exhibited: ‘Norah McGuinness’, Keys Gallery, Londonderry, 27 April to 19 May, 1979, catalogue no. 14
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


DESIGN FOR ANDREW JAMESON WINDOW, ST. MARY'S CHURCH OF IRELAND, HOWTH, COUNTY DUBLIN
DESIGN FOR ANDREW JAMESON WINDOW, ST. MARY'S CHURCH OF IRELAND, HOWTH, COUNTY DUBLIN
Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 20

Published Estimate: €800-1200

Price Realised: €0

  • Medium: gouache
  • Dimensions: 14 by 9.75in., 35 by 24.375cm.
  • Provenance: Studio of the artist; By descent to Margaret Clarke; Thence by descent to her son, David Clarke
  • The present design is for a stained-glass window in St. Mary's Church of Ireland, Howth. The finished window - which differs only slightly from the present design - is located beside the baptismal font in the church, it illustrates the miracle of Jesus and was executed in 1943 in memory of former Deputy Lieutenant, Rt. Hon Andrew Jameson of Sutton House, County Dublin.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


THE ANNUNCIATION
THE ANNUNCIATION
Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 21

Published Estimate: €800-1000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: with inscribed Dawson Gallery label on reverse
  • Medium: gouache over pencil with wash; (pentagonal)
  • Dimensions: 15.25 by 9in., 38.125 by 22.5cm.
  • Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin;Private collection
  • Exhibited: 'Religious & Secular works by Evie Hone', Dawson Gallery, Dublin, until 4 June 1957, exhibition no. 23 [Studies for Stained Glass]
  • The exhibition comprised studies for the Eton College Window, Stations of the Cross Kiltulla, Co. Galway, cartoons for the window in St. Stanisllaus College, Tullabeg, Downe Window, Kent and St. John’s Church, Malone, Belfast. Presented in original Dawson Gallery frame.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


TWO DESIGNS FOR STAINED GLASS WINDOWS
TWO DESIGNS FOR STAINED GLASS WINDOWS
Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 22

Published Estimate: €600-800

Price Realised: €0

  • Medium: gouache; (pentagonal)
  • Dimensions: 13.5 by 13in., 33.75 by 32.5cm.
  • Provenance: Studio of the artist; By descent to Margaret Clarke; Thence by descent to her son David Clarke
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


MY FOUR GREEN FIELDS, NEW YORK - DESIGN FOR STAINED GLASS WINDOW, c.1937-1938
MY FOUR GREEN FIELDS, NEW YORK - DESIGN FOR STAINED GLASS WINDOW, c.1937-1938
Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 23

Published Estimate: €3000-5000

Price Realised: €6200

  • Medium: gouache
  • Dimensions: 32.5 by 20.25in., 81.25 by 50.625cm.
  • Exhibited: possibly exhibited at the WCSI, 1939, My Four Green Fields Sketch Design for Stained Glass Window, no. 76
  • The stained-glass window, My Four Green Fields, dates from 1939 when it was commissioned by the Department of Industry and Commerce for the Irish Government's Pavilion at the New York World Trade Fair. It was installed in the CIE Head Office, O'Connell Street in 1960 and later removed to storage by Abbeyglass in Kilmainham at the request of the OPW in 1983. During the renovation of Government Buildings in 1990 the window was taken out of storage, renovated and installed in its present location at the top of the foyer staircase. The carpet on the stairs was custom made by Mary Fitzgerald to complement the colours of Hone's designs. Examples of designs for My Four Green Fields (lent by Mr & Mrs F.H. Boland, no. 94) as well as the finished window (lent by the Commissioners of the Board of Works (no. 70) were shown at the artist's retrospective exhibition, 'Evie Hone 1894-1955', Great Hall, University College Dublin, 29 July - 5 September 1958. Another design, Saints and Scholars with St. Colmcille, 1938 was shown at the IELA in 1955 and later lent to the 1958 exhibition by Dr Eileen MacCarvill. In reference to My Four Green Fields, in the exhibition catalogue to the 1958 show, James White, former Director of the National Gallery of Ireland commented:The My Four Green Fields [window] shown in the New York World's Fair must rank amongst the most important [in the artist's oeuvre] , but it is notable that a feeling of new assurance centred in the features and disposition of the figures. It was almost as if the curvaceous and rounded line of the Byzantine world were added to the Northern, Gothic style which the artist seemed to possess in common with the medieval craftsmen of Chartres and Poitiers.""

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


DESIGN FOR STAINED GLASS WINDOW DEPICTING THE DEPOSITION
DESIGN FOR STAINED GLASS WINDOW DEPICTING THE DEPOSITION
Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 24

Published Estimate: €600-800

Price Realised: €560


THE FAITHFUL DOG, 1953
THE FAITHFUL DOG, 1953
Basil Ivan Rákóczi (1908-1979)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 25

Published Estimate: €2000-3000

Price Realised: €3200

  • Signature: signed lower right; inscribed with title and dated on reverse; with artist's archival number [1992A] and inscribed 'Desbordes, Paris' label also on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 10.5 by 18in., 26.25 by 45cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Jacqueline Robinson, Paris; Private collection
  • Exhibited: possibly exhibited at the Dublin Painters' Gallery, 12-14 October 1953, this exhibition included works in oil, monotypes, gouaches and watercolours and depicted similar scenes of beasts and woodlands
  • During the early 1950s Basil Rákóczi published a range of works including de luxe editions of his own poems and illustrations, Song Book of Idiot Boy, (Paris, 1953) and The Caged and The Free (Paris, 1955) many of which published were also connected with the artistic collective, The White Stag ('Editions du Cerf Blanc' (White Stag Press’). This escape into another form of expression activated the artist and inspired some of his most important creations including the later work, Jacqueline Robinson's Et ce chant dans mon coeur... sept poemes (1971). Robinson was a dancer and friend of Mainie Jellett's who established her own dance company in Paris. She was closely affiliated with Basil Rákóczi and other members of The White Stag. Rákóczi painted Jacqueline on a few occasions and the two were romantically linked for a time.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


DRAKE RESTING, 1943
DRAKE RESTING, 1943
Kenneth Hall (1913-1946)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 26

Published Estimate: €1500-2000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 13.25 by 18.25in., 33.125 by 45.625cm.
  • Exhibited: 'Kenneth Hall 1913-1946: A Retrospective Exhibition', European Modern Art, Dublin, March 1991, no. 35
  • Literature: Herbrand, Ingouville-Williams, Three Painters: Basil Rákóczi, Kenneth Hall, Patrick Scott, at the sign of The Three Candles, Dublin, 1945, catalogue no. 12 (illustrated)
  • Drake Resting was used by Hall as a symbol on his catalogues in Dublin in the 1940s and on the cover of his Dublin retrospective in 1991. In the text Three Painters the author draws on the construction of 'subjective artwork' noting the importance of materials - the paint and colour - as crucial components in the creation of form, citing the present example by Hall as a successful implementation of these elements. He continues, …The brush is rarely used. When it is, the strokes are applied with a view not only to luminosity, but so that each stroke aids in forming the surface-pattern and rhythm of the whole design. Often the outline of an area of colour is etched in with a sharp point to give definition and to emphasise pattern." (p.19-20)"

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


WAITIING AND WATCHING
WAITIING AND WATCHING
Gerard Dillon (1916-1971)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 27

Published Estimate: €2000-3000

Price Realised: €2200


BLIZZARD, c.1946
BLIZZARD, c.1946
George Campbell RHA (1917-1979)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 28

Published Estimate: €2000-3000

Price Realised: €1500

  • Signature: signed lower left; with provenance on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 11 by 14.5in., 27.5 by 36.25cm.
  • Provenance: Victor Waddington Gallery, Dublin, April 1946;Where purchased by Mr & Mrs F.L. Vickerman
  • Exhibited: 'George Campbell', Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, from 28 March 1946
  • A copy of the original invoice for the painting accompanies this lot.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


THE FLOWER SELLER
THE FLOWER SELLER
James MacIntyre RUA (b.1926)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 29

Published Estimate: €1000-1500

Price Realised: €1000


LANDSCAPE WITH FIGURES
LANDSCAPE WITH FIGURES
Father Jack P. Hanlon (1913-1968)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 30

Published Estimate: €800-1200

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: with Neptune Gallery label on reverse
  • Medium: watercolour over pencil
  • Dimensions: 8.25 by 15in., 20.625 by 37.5cm.
  • Provenance: Neptune Gallery, Dublin;Private collection
  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


WASHER WOMEN, 1948
WASHER WOMEN, 1948
Gerard Dillon (1916-1971)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 31

Published Estimate: €1500-2500

Price Realised: €2400

  • Signature: signed and dated lower right
  • Medium: watercolour
  • Dimensions: 9.75 by 13.5in., 24.375 by 33.75cm.
  • In the summer of 1947 Dillon was invited to Italy by Pino Sagliettu, where he stayed in his family home in Borgotaro in the North. It was his first visit to mainland Europe and the Italian way of life fascinated the artist. While there he visited Florence, Lucca and Parma. For further reading see: White, James, Gerard Dillon, An Illustrated Biography, Wolfhound Press, Dublin, 1994, p.58-61

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


RIVER BOYNE, 1943
RIVER BOYNE, 1943
Gerard Dillon (1916-1971)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 32

Published Estimate: €1500-2500

Price Realised: €1400


CONNEMARA, 1947
CONNEMARA, 1947
Gerard Dillon (1916-1971)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 33

Published Estimate: €1500-2500

Price Realised: €0


INTERIOR WITH NUDE
INTERIOR WITH NUDE
Daniel O’Neill (1920-1974)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 34

Published Estimate: €15000-20000

Price Realised: €24000

  • Signature: signed lower right; inscribed with title on reverse; titled on Waddington Galleries [Montreal] label also on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 18 by 24in., 45 by 60cm.
  • Provenance: Waddington Galleries, Montreal;The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Daniel O'Neill exhibited at the Waddington Galleries between 1946 and 1955. After leaving Ireland in 1958 to move to London he exhibited with the Waddington Gallery in Montreal, Canada. During this period he also exhibited in New York (1947), in Beverly Hills, California (1948) and in a group show in Amsterdam. George Waddington, who was Victor's youngest brother, worked in the Dublin Gallery but when Victor moved to London, George decided to move to Montreal where he opened Waddington Galleries Inc in 1959.Mervyn and Pat Solomon have been known in the art world as passionate collectors of art for generations. From Belfast, the family name is also synonymous with the music industry, Mervyn's father being one of the duo Solomon & Peres (Morris Solomon and Harold Peres) music and entertainment retailers, distributors and producers based in Belfast between 1924-1981, later acquired by Decca Records. Mervyn himself founded Emerald Music in 1964 and was the first person to record Rory Gallagher and Van Morrison.The present collection demonstrates a support for Northern visual artists: Frank McKelvey, Daniel O'Neill, Colin Middleton, Tom Carr, Cecil Maguire, Martin Mooney, Markey Robinson and a clear interest in Irish artists working abroad, in Roderic O'Conor and Aloysius O'Kelly. Contemporary names such as Sandra Bell and Michael Leventis are evidence of an appreciation of later trends.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


MANNA, 1951
MANNA, 1951
Colin Middleton MBE RHA (1910-1983)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 35

Published Estimate: €20000-30000

Price Realised: €32000

  • Signature: signed upper right; signed, titled, dated [Jan/March] and numbered [107] on reverse; with original inscribed label also on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 30 by 26in., 75 by 65cm.
  • Provenance: Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin;Where purchased by Mr & Mrs Burness, New York (Janurary, 1957);Freeman's, 8 December 2002, lot 31;The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Exhibited: ‘Paintings, Colin Middleton’, Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, 9-20 April 1953, exhibition no. 15, Manna [£150-0-0]
  • Manna is an edible substance that, according to Abrahamic doctrine, God provided for the Israelites during their travels in the desert according to the Bible and the Qur'an. During the period of 1950 to 1955 Colin Middleton was living in Ardglass, Co. Down and painting full-time under contract with the Victor Waddington Galleries in Dublin. His subjects included rocky landscapes and seascapes as well as Biblical quotations, the latter being the source of inspiration for this oil. Manna was exhibited with Waddington, alongside twenty-nine other works in oil.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


NATURE MORTE, c.1909
NATURE MORTE, c.1909
Roderic O'Conor (1860-1940)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 36

Published Estimate: €30000-40000

Price Realised: €30000

  • Signature: signed and dated upper left; signed, titled and dated on reverse; with original price [15.00 frs] and numbered [5] on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 18 by 22in., 45 by 55cm.
  • Provenance: M. Zeitline, Paris;The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Exhibited: Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1909, no. 132; 'Roderic O'Conor Room', Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Dublin, 1995-2000
  • Literature: Johnston, Roy, Roderic O'Conor Vision and Expression, 1996, p.48-49
  • This group of eleven oil paintings and etchings by Roderic O'Conor spans thirty years of the artist's career, encompassing many of his favourite subjects and deploying the entire repertoire of expressive gestures and marks and the high-keyed palette for which he has become famous. The collection moves in time as well as place: from the windswept rocky coastline of Finistère in 1893 (see lots 42 & 44), to the shaded, tree-lined roads near Barbizon in 1902, to the life models and domestic objects of O'Conor's Parisian studio, and finally to the craggy peaks of the Côte d'Azur. There is even a work that melds the normally distinct genres of figure and landscape, namely the lithograph Two Women in Profile in a Landscape (lot 42), the descriptive title of which belies its innovative conception and its boldly simplified forms.O'Conor's experimental rigour pervades this entire group of works - he was never a man to go for the easy option of academic realism. With their impulsive, whipped lines, the four etchings evince the clash of the elements on the storm-torn coast of Brittany, an alien and barren terrain that acquires, at the hands of O'Conor, the appearance of a lunar landscape. When he positions the horizon line lower down the copper plate, he manages to make even the clouds appear tortured. At this early date (1893), the Irishman was looking to Van Gogh for inspiration, especially the rhythmic bands of pure colour that energised the Dutchman's St Remy and Arles landscapes. In 1908 O'Conor would pay verbal tribute to Van Gogh's paintings as wonderful examples of expression of character pushed to the point of hallucination." Just a few years earlier, on a visit to Montigny-sur-Loing, he articulated the foliage, sky and grassy bank of his oil painting, Avenue of Trees (lot 39) with alternating stripes of colour, just as he had done a decade earlier in Pont-Aven.Whilst the predominant mood of these early works might be characterised as controlled anarchy, at least in the handling of paint, O'Conor was also capable of extracting subtlety and understatement from his colours. This is nowhere more apparent than in Chrysanthemums (lot 38), dating from 1896, when he was rethinking his art in the solitude of the little Breton town of Rochefort-en-terre. Here the feathery touch and carefully orchestrated colour harmonies (red predominating) recall no-one so much as Auguste Renoir, who visited Pont-Aven with his family in 1892 and was eulogised in the exchange of letters between Armand Seguin and O'Conor later in the decade. Similarly, the way O'Conor contrasts the softly blended brushstrokes describing the limbs and torso of the nude in Nu allongé (lot 37) with a more painterly approach in the foreground recalls Renoir's late paintings of bathers.O'Conor's affinity for the primitive life Brittany offered sometimes found an echo in pictures from his early years in Paris. In Nature morte (lot 36) of 1909, hand-painted Breton faïence, a white napkin and some fruit are partnered with an English posset pot, creating a homely assemblage that recalls, in its carefully articulated geometry, Cézanne's famous admonition to "treat nature by means of the cylinder, the sphere, the cone." A few years later in date, the small panel painting Montagne Sainte-Victoire (lot 43) demonstrates how the lure of the South, as celebrated in Cézanne's landscapes of his native Aix-en-Provence, became too much for O'Conor to resist. Here, using colour modulations at the expense of detail, he achieves the monumental, notwithstanding the small scale. In the years following the WWI, O'Conor continued to paint female models and still lifes, albeit without returning to the Post-Impressionist idiom of his pre-war years. This new development is demonstrated to good effect in Seated Model (lot 40), where the dramatic transverse lighting and the use of the palette knife to accentuate the modelling of forms are in keeping with the methods of the so-called École de Paris - painters such as Dunoyer de Segonzac, Chaïm Soutine and Maurice de Vlaminck. In the background of O'Conor's portrait one can just glimpse his cast of Daumier's bronze sculpture, Les emigrants, as if by way of homage from one dedicated interpreter of the human clay to another.Jonathan BeningtonFebruary 2013"

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


NU ALLONGÉ, c.1915
NU ALLONGÉ, c.1915
Roderic O'Conor (1860-1940)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 37

Published Estimate: €15000-20000

Price Realised: €12500

  • Signature: signed lower right; with O'Conor Atelier stamp on reverse; inscribed verso on stretcher bar in blue chalk: 'No. 4 Roderic O'Conor D??? No. 4'
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 26 by 32in., 65 by 80cm.
  • Provenance: Paris, Hôtel Drouot, Etude Tajan, Tableaux Modernes, École de Paris (Succession de Mademoiselle Abadie), 21 November 1995, no. 130;The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Author Jonathan Benington notes that the model's blue-painted eyes were added later by another hand, and that originally she was most probably depicted asleep, with eyes shut. The brightly coloured textile seen in the present work was used as a studio prop and features in other works by O'Conor. This group of eleven oil paintings and etchings by Roderic O'Conor spans thirty years of the artist's career, encompassing many of his favourite subjects and deploying the entire repertoire of expressive gestures and marks and the high-keyed palette for which he has become famous. The collection moves in time as well as place: from the windswept rocky coastline of Finistère in 1893 (see lots 42 & 44), to the shaded, tree-lined roads near Barbizon in 1902, to the life models and domestic objects of O'Conor's Parisian studio, and finally to the craggy peaks of the Côte d'Azur. There is even a work that melds the normally distinct genres of figure and landscape, namely the lithograph Two Women in Profile in a Landscape (lot 42), the descriptive title of which belies its innovative conception and its boldly simplified forms.O'Conor's experimental rigour pervades this entire group of works - he was never a man to go for the easy option of academic realism. With their impulsive, whipped lines, the four etchings evince the clash of the elements on the storm-torn coast of Brittany, an alien and barren terrain that acquires, at the hands of O'Conor, the appearance of a lunar landscape. When he positions the horizon line lower down the copper plate, he manages to make even the clouds appear tortured. At this early date (1893), the Irishman was looking to Van Gogh for inspiration, especially the rhythmic bands of pure colour that energised the Dutchman's St Remy and Arles landscapes. In 1908 O'Conor would pay verbal tribute to Van Gogh's paintings as wonderful examples of expression of character pushed to the point of hallucination." Just a few years earlier, on a visit to Montigny-sur-Loing, he articulated the foliage, sky and grassy bank of his oil painting, Avenue of Trees (lot 39) with alternating stripes of colour, just as he had done a decade earlier in Pont-Aven.Whilst the predominant mood of these early works might be characterised as controlled anarchy, at least in the handling of paint, O'Conor was also capable of extracting subtlety and understatement from his colours. This is nowhere more apparent than in Chrysanthemums (lot 38), dating from 1896, when he was rethinking his art in the solitude of the little Breton town of Rochefort-en-terre. Here the feathery touch and carefully orchestrated colour harmonies (red predominating) recall no-one so much as Auguste Renoir, who visited Pont-Aven with his family in 1892 and was eulogised in the exchange of letters between Armand Seguin and O'Conor later in the decade. Similarly, the way O'Conor contrasts the softly blended brushstrokes describing the limbs and torso of the nude in Nu allongé (lot 37) with a more painterly approach in the foreground recalls Renoir's late paintings of bathers.O'Conor's affinity for the primitive life Brittany offered sometimes found an echo in pictures from his early years in Paris. In Nature morte (lot 36) of 1909, hand-painted Breton faïence, a white napkin and some fruit are partnered with an English posset pot, creating a homely assemblage that recalls, in its carefully articulated geometry, Cézanne's famous admonition to "treat nature by means of the cylinder, the sphere, the cone." A few years later in date, the small panel painting Montagne Sainte-Victoire (lot 43) demonstrates how the lure of the South, as celebrated in Cézanne's landscapes of his native Aix-en-Provence, became too much for O'Conor to resist. Here, using colour modulations at the expense of detail, he achieves the monumental, notwithstanding the small scale. In the years following the WWI, O'Conor continued to paint female models and still lifes, albeit without returning to the Post-Impressionist idiom of his pre-war years. This new development is demonstrated to good effect in Seated Model (lot 40), where the dramatic transverse lighting and the use of the palette knife to accentuate the modelling of forms are in keeping with the methods of the so-called École de Paris - painters such as Dunoyer de Segonzac, Chaïm Soutine and Maurice de Vlaminck. In the background of O'Conor's portrait one can just glimpse his cast of Daumier's bronze sculpture, Les emigrants, as if by way of homage from one dedicated interpreter of the human clay to another.Jonathan BeningtonFebruary 2013"

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 1896
CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 1896
Roderic O'Conor (1860-1940)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 38

Published Estimate: €20000-30000

Price Realised: €19000

  • Signature: signed lower left; signed with initials and dated upper left; titled on original label on reverse
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 21.25 by 25.5in., 53.125 by 63.75cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • This group of eleven oil paintings and etchings by Roderic O'Conor spans thirty years of the artist's career, encompassing many of his favourite subjects and deploying the entire repertoire of expressive gestures and marks and the high-keyed palette for which he has become famous. The collection moves in time as well as place: from the windswept rocky coastline of Finistère in 1893 (see lots 42 & 44), to the shaded, tree-lined roads near Barbizon in 1902, to the life models and domestic objects of O'Conor's Parisian studio, and finally to the craggy peaks of the Côte d'Azur. There is even a work that melds the normally distinct genres of figure and landscape, namely the lithograph Two Women in Profile in a Landscape (lot 42), the descriptive title of which belies its innovative conception and its boldly simplified forms.O'Conor's experimental rigour pervades this entire group of works - he was never a man to go for the easy option of academic realism. With their impulsive, whipped lines, the four etchings evince the clash of the elements on the storm-torn coast of Brittany, an alien and barren terrain that acquires, at the hands of O'Conor, the appearance of a lunar landscape. When he positions the horizon line lower down the copper plate, he manages to make even the clouds appear tortured. At this early date (1893), the Irishman was looking to Van Gogh for inspiration, especially the rhythmic bands of pure colour that energised the Dutchman's St Remy and Arles landscapes. In 1908 O'Conor would pay verbal tribute to Van Gogh's paintings as wonderful examples of expression of character pushed to the point of hallucination." Just a few years earlier, on a visit to Montigny-sur-Loing, he articulated the foliage, sky and grassy bank of his oil painting, Avenue of Trees (lot 39) with alternating stripes of colour, just as he had done a decade earlier in Pont-Aven.Whilst the predominant mood of these early works might be characterised as controlled anarchy, at least in the handling of paint, O'Conor was also capable of extracting subtlety and understatement from his colours. This is nowhere more apparent than in Chrysanthemums (lot 38), dating from 1896, when he was rethinking his art in the solitude of the little Breton town of Rochefort-en-terre. Here the feathery touch and carefully orchestrated colour harmonies (red predominating) recall no-one so much as Auguste Renoir, who visited Pont-Aven with his family in 1892 and was eulogised in the exchange of letters between Armand Seguin and O'Conor later in the decade. Similarly, the way O'Conor contrasts the softly blended brushstrokes describing the limbs and torso of the nude in Nu allongé (lot 37) with a more painterly approach in the foreground recalls Renoir's late paintings of bathers.O'Conor's affinity for the primitive life Brittany offered sometimes found an echo in pictures from his early years in Paris. In Nature morte (lot 36) of 1909, hand-painted Breton faïence, a white napkin and some fruit are partnered with an English posset pot, creating a homely assemblage that recalls, in its carefully articulated geometry, Cézanne's famous admonition to "treat nature by means of the cylinder, the sphere, the cone." A few years later in date, the small panel painting Montagne Sainte-Victoire (lot 43) demonstrates how the lure of the South, as celebrated in Cézanne's landscapes of his native Aix-en-Provence, became too much for O'Conor to resist. Here, using colour modulations at the expense of detail, he achieves the monumental, notwithstanding the small scale. In the years following the WWI, O'Conor continued to paint female models and still lifes, albeit without returning to the Post-Impressionist idiom of his pre-war years. This new development is demonstrated to good effect in Seated Model (lot 40), where the dramatic transverse lighting and the use of the palette knife to accentuate the modelling of forms are in keeping with the methods of the so-called École de Paris - painters such as Dunoyer de Segonzac, Chaïm Soutine and Maurice de Vlaminck. In the background of O'Conor's portrait one can just glimpse his cast of Daumier's bronze sculpture, Les emigrants, as if by way of homage from one dedicated interpreter of the human clay to another.Jonathan BeningtonFebruary 2013"

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


AVENUE OF TREES
AVENUE OF TREES
Roderic O'Conor (1860-1940)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 39

Published Estimate: €8000-10000

Price Realised: €10500

  • Signature: with Atelier O'Conor stamp lower right; also stamped on reverse
  • Medium: oil on paper
  • Dimensions: 16 by 15in., 40 by 37.5cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Probably painted at Montigny circa 1902. This group of eleven oil paintings and etchings by Roderic O'Conor spans thirty years of the artist's career, encompassing many of his favourite subjects and deploying the entire repertoire of expressive gestures and marks and the high-keyed palette for which he has become famous. The collection moves in time as well as place: from the windswept rocky coastline of Finistère in 1893 (see lots 42 & 44), to the shaded, tree-lined roads near Barbizon in 1902, to the life models and domestic objects of O'Conor's Parisian studio, and finally to the craggy peaks of the Côte d'Azur. There is even a work that melds the normally distinct genres of figure and landscape, namely the lithograph Two Women in Profile in a Landscape (lot 42), the descriptive title of which belies its innovative conception and its boldly simplified forms.O'Conor's experimental rigour pervades this entire group of works - he was never a man to go for the easy option of academic realism. With their impulsive, whipped lines, the four etchings evince the clash of the elements on the storm-torn coast of Brittany, an alien and barren terrain that acquires, at the hands of O'Conor, the appearance of a lunar landscape. When he positions the horizon line lower down the copper plate, he manages to make even the clouds appear tortured. At this early date (1893), the Irishman was looking to Van Gogh for inspiration, especially the rhythmic bands of pure colour that energised the Dutchman's St Remy and Arles landscapes. In 1908 O'Conor would pay verbal tribute to Van Gogh's paintings as wonderful examples of expression of character pushed to the point of hallucination." Just a few years earlier, on a visit to Montigny-sur-Loing, he articulated the foliage, sky and grassy bank of his oil painting, Avenue of Trees (lot 39) with alternating stripes of colour, just as he had done a decade earlier in Pont-Aven.Whilst the predominant mood of these early works might be characterised as controlled anarchy, at least in the handling of paint, O'Conor was also capable of extracting subtlety and understatement from his colours. This is nowhere more apparent than in Chrysanthemums (lot 38), dating from 1896, when he was rethinking his art in the solitude of the little Breton town of Rochefort-en-terre. Here the feathery touch and carefully orchestrated colour harmonies (red predominating) recall no-one so much as Auguste Renoir, who visited Pont-Aven with his family in 1892 and was eulogised in the exchange of letters between Armand Seguin and O'Conor later in the decade. Similarly, the way O'Conor contrasts the softly blended brushstrokes describing the limbs and torso of the nude in Nu allongé (lot 37) with a more painterly approach in the foreground recalls Renoir's late paintings of bathers.O'Conor's affinity for the primitive life Brittany offered sometimes found an echo in pictures from his early years in Paris. In Nature morte (lot 36) of 1909, hand-painted Breton faïence, a white napkin and some fruit are partnered with an English posset pot, creating a homely assemblage that recalls, in its carefully articulated geometry, Cézanne's famous admonition to "treat nature by means of the cylinder, the sphere, the cone." A few years later in date, the small panel painting Montagne Sainte-Victoire (lot 43) demonstrates how the lure of the South, as celebrated in Cézanne's landscapes of his native Aix-en-Provence, became too much for O'Conor to resist. Here, using colour modulations at the expense of detail, he achieves the monumental, notwithstanding the small scale. In the years following the WWI, O'Conor continued to paint female models and still lifes, albeit without returning to the Post-Impressionist idiom of his pre-war years. This new development is demonstrated to good effect in Seated Model (lot 40), where the dramatic transverse lighting and the use of the palette knife to accentuate the modelling of forms are in keeping with the methods of the so-called École de Paris - painters such as Dunoyer de Segonzac, Chaïm Soutine and Maurice de Vlaminck. In the background of O'Conor's portrait one can just glimpse his cast of Daumier's bronze sculpture, Les emigrants, as if by way of homage from one dedicated interpreter of the human clay to another.Jonathan BeningtonFebruary 2013"

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


SEATED MODEL, c.1923-1926
SEATED MODEL, c.1923-1926
Roderic O'Conor (1860-1940)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 40

Published Estimate: €8000-10000

Price Realised: €9000

  • Signature: signed upper right
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 21.5 by 18in., 53.75 by 45cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Seated Model, c.1923-1926 pertains to a series of clothed, female models, painted by O'Conor at his Montparnasse Studio, Rue de Cherche-Midi, Paris.This group of eleven oil paintings and etchings by Roderic O'Conor spans thirty years of the artist's career, encompassing many of his favourite subjects and deploying the entire repertoire of expressive gestures and marks and the high-keyed palette for which he has become famous. The collection moves in time as well as place: from the windswept rocky coastline of Finistère in 1893 (see lots 42 & 44), to the shaded, tree-lined roads near Barbizon in 1902, to the life models and domestic objects of O'Conor's Parisian studio, and finally to the craggy peaks of the Côte d'Azur. There is even a work that melds the normally distinct genres of figure and landscape, namely the lithograph Two Women in Profile in a Landscape (lot 42), the descriptive title of which belies its innovative conception and its boldly simplified forms.O'Conor's experimental rigour pervades this entire group of works - he was never a man to go for the easy option of academic realism. With their impulsive, whipped lines, the four etchings evince the clash of the elements on the storm-torn coast of Brittany, an alien and barren terrain that acquires, at the hands of O'Conor, the appearance of a lunar landscape. When he positions the horizon line lower down the copper plate, he manages to make even the clouds appear tortured. At this early date (1893), the Irishman was looking to Van Gogh for inspiration, especially the rhythmic bands of pure colour that energised the Dutchman's St Remy and Arles landscapes. In 1908 O'Conor would pay verbal tribute to Van Gogh's paintings as wonderful examples of expression of character pushed to the point of hallucination." Just a few years earlier, on a visit to Montigny-sur-Loing, he articulated the foliage, sky and grassy bank of his oil painting, Avenue of Trees (lot 39) with alternating stripes of colour, just as he had done a decade earlier in Pont-Aven.Whilst the predominant mood of these early works might be characterised as controlled anarchy, at least in the handling of paint, O'Conor was also capable of extracting subtlety and understatement from his colours. This is nowhere more apparent than in Chrysanthemums (lot 38), dating from 1896, when he was rethinking his art in the solitude of the little Breton town of Rochefort-en-terre. Here the feathery touch and carefully orchestrated colour harmonies (red predominating) recall no-one so much as Auguste Renoir, who visited Pont-Aven with his family in 1892 and was eulogised in the exchange of letters between Armand Seguin and O'Conor later in the decade. Similarly, the way O'Conor contrasts the softly blended brushstrokes describing the limbs and torso of the nude in Nu allongé (lot 37) with a more painterly approach in the foreground recalls Renoir's late paintings of bathers.O'Conor's affinity for the primitive life Brittany offered sometimes found an echo in pictures from his early years in Paris. In Nature morte (lot 36) of 1909, hand-painted Breton faïence, a white napkin and some fruit are partnered with an English posset pot, creating a homely assemblage that recalls, in its carefully articulated geometry, Cézanne's famous admonition to "treat nature by means of the cylinder, the sphere, the cone." A few years later in date, the small panel painting Montagne Sainte-Victoire (lot 43) demonstrates how the lure of the South, as celebrated in Cézanne's landscapes of his native Aix-en-Provence, became too much for O'Conor to resist. Here, using colour modulations at the expense of detail, he achieves the monumental, notwithstanding the small scale. In the years following the WWI, O'Conor continued to paint female models and still lifes, albeit without returning to the Post-Impressionist idiom of his pre-war years. This new development is demonstrated to good effect in Seated Model (lot 40), where the dramatic transverse lighting and the use of the palette knife to accentuate the modelling of forms are in keeping with the methods of the so-called École de Paris - painters such as Dunoyer de Segonzac, Chaïm Soutine and Maurice de Vlaminck. In the background of O'Conor's portrait one can just glimpse his cast of Daumier's bronze sculpture, Les emigrants, as if by way of homage from one dedicated interpreter of the human clay to another.Jonathan BeningtonFebruary 2013"

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


LA MAISON DU PENDU AU POULDU, BEACH WITH CLIFFS AND A YACHT, 1893 and DEUX FEMMES DE PROFIL DANS UN PAYSAGE (SET OF 3)
LA MAISON DU PENDU AU POULDU, BEACH WITH CLIFFS AND A YACHT, 1893 and DEUX FEMMES DE PROFIL DANS UN PAYSAGE (SET OF 3)
Roderic O'Conor (1860-1940)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 42

Published Estimate: €1000-1500

Price Realised: €2600

  • Signature: the first, stamped within the image lower right; inscribed [1/30 / Tirage 81] in pencil in the margin lower right; the second, signed and dated in the plate; the third signed in the plate lower left
  • Medium: etching; (2); lithograph; (1)
  • Dimensions: 5.5 by 9in., 13.75 by 22.5cm.
  • Provenance: Deux Femmes de Profil dans un Paysage: Purchased by Mervyn & Pat Solomon, 1984
  • Exhibited: La Maison du Pendu au Pouldu: Musée de Pont-Aven, 1984, catalogue no. 78 (another edition) (illustrated p.53)Deux Femmes de Profil dans un Paysage: L'École de Pont-Aven dans les Collections publiques et privées de Bretagne, Musée Des Beaux-Arts, Quimper,
  • Literature: La Maison du Pendu au Pouldu:Johnston, Roy, Roderic O'Conor 1860-1940, Barbican Art Gallery, London and Ulster Museum, Belfast, 1985, catalogue no. 102 (illustrated p.113); Benington, Jonathan, Roderic O'Conor, Irish Academic Press, Dublin, 1992, catalogu
  • The lithograph within this lot is one of only two examples known in this medium. It is thought to have been printed in 1898. Dimensions of Beach with Cliffs and a Yacht, 1893 and Deux Femmes de Profil dans un Paysage, 9.75 by 15.25 and 7.50 by 6.75ins., respectively.An edition of Deux Femmes de Profil dans un Paysage can be found in the collection of Musée Des Beaux-Arts, Quimper.This group of eleven oil paintings and etchings by Roderic O'Conor spans thirty years of the artist's career, encompassing many of his favourite subjects and deploying the entire repertoire of expressive gestures and marks and the high-keyed palette for which he has become famous. The collection moves in time as well as place: from the windswept rocky coastline of Finistère in 1893 (see lots 42 & 44), to the shaded, tree-lined roads near Barbizon in 1902, to the life models and domestic objects of O'Conor's Parisian studio, and finally to the craggy peaks of the Côte d'Azur. There is even a work that melds the normally distinct genres of figure and landscape, namely the lithograph Two Women in Profile in a Landscape (lot 42), the descriptive title of which belies its innovative conception and its boldly simplified forms.O'Conor's experimental rigour pervades this entire group of works - he was never a man to go for the easy option of academic realism. With their impulsive, whipped lines, the four etchings evince the clash of the elements on the storm-torn coast of Brittany, an alien and barren terrain that acquires, at the hands of O'Conor, the appearance of a lunar landscape. When he positions the horizon line lower down the copper plate, he manages to make even the clouds appear tortured. At this early date (1893), the Irishman was looking to Van Gogh for inspiration, especially the rhythmic bands of pure colour that energised the Dutchman's St Remy and Arles landscapes. In 1908 O'Conor would pay verbal tribute to Van Gogh's paintings as wonderful examples of expression of character pushed to the point of hallucination." Just a few years earlier, on a visit to Montigny-sur-Loing, he articulated the foliage, sky and grassy bank of his oil painting, Avenue of Trees (lot 39) with alternating stripes of colour, just as he had done a decade earlier in Pont-Aven.Whilst the predominant mood of these early works might be characterised as controlled anarchy, at least in the handling of paint, O'Conor was also capable of extracting subtlety and understatement from his colours. This is nowhere more apparent than in Chrysanthemums (lot 38), dating from 1896, when he was rethinking his art in the solitude of the little Breton town of Rochefort-en-terre. Here the feathery touch and carefully orchestrated colour harmonies (red predominating) recall no-one so much as Auguste Renoir, who visited Pont-Aven with his family in 1892 and was eulogised in the exchange of letters between Armand Seguin and O'Conor later in the decade. Similarly, the way O'Conor contrasts the softly blended brushstrokes describing the limbs and torso of the nude in Nu allongé (lot 37) with a more painterly approach in the foreground recalls Renoir's late paintings of bathers.O'Conor's affinity for the primitive life Brittany offered sometimes found an echo in pictures from his early years in Paris. In Nature morte (lot 36) of 1909, hand-painted Breton faïence, a white napkin and some fruit are partnered with an English posset pot, creating a homely assemblage that recalls, in its carefully articulated geometry, Cézanne's famous admonition to "treat nature by means of the cylinder, the sphere, the cone." A few years later in date, the small panel painting Montagne Sainte-Victoire (lot 43) demonstrates how the lure of the South, as celebrated in Cézanne's landscapes of his native Aix-en-Provence, became too much for O'Conor to resist. Here, using colour modulations at the expense of detail, he achieves the monumental, notwithstanding the small scale. In the years following the WWI, O'Conor continued to paint female models and still lifes, albeit without returning to the Post-Impressionist idiom of his pre-war years. This new development is demonstrated to good effect in Seated Model (lot 40), where the dramatic transverse lighting and the use of the palette knife to accentuate the modelling of forms are in keeping with the methods of the so-called École de Paris - painters such as Dunoyer de Segonzac, Chaïm Soutine and Maurice de Vlaminck. In the background of O'Conor's portrait one can just glimpse his cast of Daumier's bronze sculpture, Les emigrants, as if by way of homage from one dedicated interpreter of the human clay to another.Jonathan BeningtonFebruary 2013"

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


MONTAGNE SAINTE-VICTOIRE, FRANCE
MONTAGNE SAINTE-VICTOIRE, FRANCE
Roderic O'Conor (1860-1940)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 43

Published Estimate: €1500-1800

Price Realised: €4800

  • Signature: with faint Atelier O'Conor stamp on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 5.75 by 9in., 14.375 by 22.5cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Literature: Jonathan Benington, Roderic O'Conor: a Biography with a Catalogue of his Work, 1992, catalogue no.177, p. 211, as Mountain Landscape
  • The subject of this picture has not been conclusively identified, although on grounds of topography it bears comparison with Le Cap Canail in Cassis, which was close to where O'Conor was based for much of 1913.This group of eleven oil paintings and etchings by Roderic O'Conor spans thirty years of the artist's career, encompassing many of his favourite subjects and deploying the entire repertoire of expressive gestures and marks and the high-keyed palette for which he has become famous. The collection moves in time as well as place: from the windswept rocky coastline of Finistère in 1893 (see lots 42 & 44), to the shaded, tree-lined roads near Barbizon in 1902, to the life models and domestic objects of O'Conor's Parisian studio, and finally to the craggy peaks of the Côte d'Azur. There is even a work that melds the normally distinct genres of figure and landscape, namely the lithograph Two Women in Profile in a Landscape (lot 42), the descriptive title of which belies its innovative conception and its boldly simplified forms.O'Conor's experimental rigour pervades this entire group of works - he was never a man to go for the easy option of academic realism. With their impulsive, whipped lines, the four etchings evince the clash of the elements on the storm-torn coast of Brittany, an alien and barren terrain that acquires, at the hands of O'Conor, the appearance of a lunar landscape. When he positions the horizon line lower down the copper plate, he manages to make even the clouds appear tortured. At this early date (1893), the Irishman was looking to Van Gogh for inspiration, especially the rhythmic bands of pure colour that energised the Dutchman's St Remy and Arles landscapes. In 1908 O'Conor would pay verbal tribute to Van Gogh's paintings as wonderful examples of expression of character pushed to the point of hallucination." Just a few years earlier, on a visit to Montigny-sur-Loing, he articulated the foliage, sky and grassy bank of his oil painting, Avenue of Trees (lot 39) with alternating stripes of colour, just as he had done a decade earlier in Pont-Aven.Whilst the predominant mood of these early works might be characterised as controlled anarchy, at least in the handling of paint, O'Conor was also capable of extracting subtlety and understatement from his colours. This is nowhere more apparent than in Chrysanthemums (lot 38), dating from 1896, when he was rethinking his art in the solitude of the little Breton town of Rochefort-en-terre. Here the feathery touch and carefully orchestrated colour harmonies (red predominating) recall no-one so much as Auguste Renoir, who visited Pont-Aven with his family in 1892 and was eulogised in the exchange of letters between Armand Seguin and O'Conor later in the decade. Similarly, the way O'Conor contrasts the softly blended brushstrokes describing the limbs and torso of the nude in Nu allongé (lot 37) with a more painterly approach in the foreground recalls Renoir's late paintings of bathers.O'Conor's affinity for the primitive life Brittany offered sometimes found an echo in pictures from his early years in Paris. In Nature morte (lot 36) of 1909, hand-painted Breton faïence, a white napkin and some fruit are partnered with an English posset pot, creating a homely assemblage that recalls, in its carefully articulated geometry, Cézanne's famous admonition to "treat nature by means of the cylinder, the sphere, the cone." A few years later in date, the small panel painting Montagne Sainte-Victoire (lot 43) demonstrates how the lure of the South, as celebrated in Cézanne's landscapes of his native Aix-en-Provence, became too much for O'Conor to resist. Here, using colour modulations at the expense of detail, he achieves the monumental, notwithstanding the small scale. In the years following the WWI, O'Conor continued to paint female models and still lifes, albeit without returning to the Post-Impressionist idiom of his pre-war years. This new development is demonstrated to good effect in Seated Model (lot 40), where the dramatic transverse lighting and the use of the palette knife to accentuate the modelling of forms are in keeping with the methods of the so-called École de Paris - painters such as Dunoyer de Segonzac, Chaïm Soutine and Maurice de Vlaminck. In the background of O'Conor's portrait one can just glimpse his cast of Daumier's bronze sculpture, Les emigrants, as if by way of homage from one dedicated interpreter of the human clay to another.Jonathan BeningtonFebruary 2013"

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


HOUSE ABOVE THE CLIFF, SUNLIGHT THROUGH THE CLOUDS and LE VERGER, c.1893 (SET OF 3)
HOUSE ABOVE THE CLIFF, SUNLIGHT THROUGH THE CLOUDS and LE VERGER, c.1893 (SET OF 3)
Roderic O'Conor (1860-1940)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 44

Published Estimate: €1000-1500

Price Realised: €2600

  • Signature: the first with Barbican Art Gallery exhibition label on reverse; the second signed and dated in the plate lower right; inscribed [2/30/ Tirage 81] in pencil in the margin lower right; third signed in the plate lower left
  • Medium: etching; (1) etching and drypoint; (2)
  • Dimensions: 10.5 by 13.25in., 26.25 by 33.125cm.
  • Provenance: (First) possibly, Hôtel Drouat Salle I, Paul Renard;The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Exhibited: (First) Pont Aven 1984 (another edition); London, 1985 (another edition)(Second) 'L'estampe en Bretagne', Musée des Beaux-Arts, Nantes, 1974, catalogue no. 145; Quimper, 1978, no. 72); Pont-Aven, 1984, no. 71; London, 1989, no. 0.7; Paris, 1989, no. 134 (
  • Literature: Benington, Jonathan, Roderic O'Conor, Irish Academic Press, Dublin, 1992, catalogue nos. 441 and 430, respectively (both illustrated p.55); Johnston Roy, Roderic O'Conor, catalogue de l'oeuvre grave, Musée de Pont-Aven, 1999, no. 15 (illustrated)
  • Le Verger was conceived in 1893. The original plate for the present work was sold at Hôtel Drouot, 17 November 1975 (lot 172, no. 4). From that plate later re-strikes were made in 1981 by Paul Prouté S.A. in an edition of 100. Dimensions of second title: 10.50 by 13.25in.This group of eleven oil paintings and etchings by Roderic O'Conor spans thirty years of the artist's career, encompassing many of his favourite subjects and deploying the entire repertoire of expressive gestures and marks and the high-keyed palette for which he has become famous. The collection moves in time as well as place: from the windswept rocky coastline of Finistère in 1893 (see lots 42 & 44), to the shaded, tree-lined roads near Barbizon in 1902, to the life models and domestic objects of O'Conor's Parisian studio, and finally to the craggy peaks of the Côte d'Azur. There is even a work that melds the normally distinct genres of figure and landscape, namely the lithograph Two Women in Profile in a Landscape (lot 42), the descriptive title of which belies its innovative conception and its boldly simplified forms.O'Conor's experimental rigour pervades this entire group of works - he was never a man to go for the easy option of academic realism. With their impulsive, whipped lines, the four etchings evince the clash of the elements on the storm-torn coast of Brittany, an alien and barren terrain that acquires, at the hands of O'Conor, the appearance of a lunar landscape. When he positions the horizon line lower down the copper plate, he manages to make even the clouds appear tortured. At this early date (1893), the Irishman was looking to Van Gogh for inspiration, especially the rhythmic bands of pure colour that energised the Dutchman's St Remy and Arles landscapes. In 1908 O'Conor would pay verbal tribute to Van Gogh's paintings as wonderful examples of expression of character pushed to the point of hallucination." Just a few years earlier, on a visit to Montigny-sur-Loing, he articulated the foliage, sky and grassy bank of his oil painting, Avenue of Trees (lot 39) with alternating stripes of colour, just as he had done a decade earlier in Pont-Aven.Whilst the predominant mood of these early works might be characterised as controlled anarchy, at least in the handling of paint, O'Conor was also capable of extracting subtlety and understatement from his colours. This is nowhere more apparent than in Chrysanthemums (lot 38), dating from 1896, when he was rethinking his art in the solitude of the little Breton town of Rochefort-en-terre. Here the feathery touch and carefully orchestrated colour harmonies (red predominating) recall no-one so much as Auguste Renoir, who visited Pont-Aven with his family in 1892 and was eulogised in the exchange of letters between Armand Seguin and O'Conor later in the decade. Similarly, the way O'Conor contrasts the softly blended brushstrokes describing the limbs and torso of the nude in Nu allongé (lot 37) with a more painterly approach in the foreground recalls Renoir's late paintings of bathers.O'Conor's affinity for the primitive life Brittany offered sometimes found an echo in pictures from his early years in Paris. In Nature morte (lot 36) of 1909, hand-painted Breton faïence, a white napkin and some fruit are partnered with an English posset pot, creating a homely assemblage that recalls, in its carefully articulated geometry, Cézanne's famous admonition to "treat nature by means of the cylinder, the sphere, the cone." A few years later in date, the small panel painting Montagne Sainte-Victoire (lot 43) demonstrates how the lure of the South, as celebrated in Cézanne's landscapes of his native Aix-en-Provence, became too much for O'Conor to resist. Here, using colour modulations at the expense of detail, he achieves the monumental, notwithstanding the small scale. In the years following the WWI, O'Conor continued to paint female models and still lifes, albeit without returning to the Post-Impressionist idiom of his pre-war years. This new development is demonstrated to good effect in Seated Model (lot 40), where the dramatic transverse lighting and the use of the palette knife to accentuate the modelling of forms are in keeping with the methods of the so-called École de Paris - painters such as Dunoyer de Segonzac, Chaïm Soutine and Maurice de Vlaminck. In the background of O'Conor's portrait one can just glimpse his cast of Daumier's bronze sculpture, Les emigrants, as if by way of homage from one dedicated interpreter of the human clay to another.Jonathan BeningtonFebruary 2013"

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


ENGLISH PEASANT CHOPPING SWEDES, c.1887-1888
ENGLISH PEASANT CHOPPING SWEDES, c.1887-1888
Aloysius C. O’Kelly (1853-1936)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 45

Published Estimate: €6000-8000

Price Realised: €10500

  • Signature: signed lower right; with original label preserved on reverse, numbered [38]
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 27 by 20in., 67.5 by 50cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Aloysius O'Kelly (1853-1936) was born in Dublin as Aloysius Kelly, and immigrated to London in 1861, where he adopted the prefix O'. O'Kelly belonged to a Fenian family. His older brothers, James, Charles and Stephen, were all Fenians, and sculptors (trained by their uncle, John Lawlor, the well-known Irish sculptor in London). O'Kelly lived a life of art and sedition, operating as a painter and activist in Ireland, Britain, France and the United States, as well as in outposts of the empire, such as Sudan and Egypt. His connections to the shadowy world of Irish republican politics permeated his work. Aloysius was closest to James, who was instrumental in building up the Irish Republican Brotherhood in Britain, was active in the Land League, was elected Member of Parliament for Roscommon in 1880 and a key figure in securing Charles Stewart Parnell's agreement for the New Departure. The most radical Irish artist of his era, O'Kelly was prolific and eclectic: Realist in Ireland, Naturalist in France and Orientalist in North Africa, forging all the time new connections between art and anti-colonial politics.O'Kelly was accepted by the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1874, to the studio of Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904), a not inconsequential achievement. He also studied with the portraitist, Joseph-Florentin-Léon Bonnat (1833-1922). He was one of the first Irish artists to go to Brittany, to Pont-Aven, and later Corncarneau. There he mixed with the American colony blending academic, realist and plein-air elements into an innovative mode of rural Naturalism. From France, O'Kelly returned to Ireland in the early 1880s, as 'Special Artist' to The Illustrated London News, giving visual expression to the harsh realities of Irish rural life. Here the Freeman's Journal declared him 'the most important of modern artists', and of 'exceptionally high rank' (2 June 1888). His Mass in a Connemara Cabin (National Gallery of Ireland, 1883) had the distinction of being the first painting of an Irish subject ever exhibited in the Paris Salon. In North Africa, O'Kelly painted many typical scenes, but tended to avoid the emblems of Orientalism, scenes of extremism and characterisations of incompetence that might justify colonial domination. His North African and Middle Eastern paintings reveal a predominantly ethnographic interest. His adoption of the name Oakley in Cairo also points to political activism, leading to a dangerous adventure in which he and his brother, James, followed their friend, Edmond O'Donovan, the Fenian and internationally renowned journalist, to Sudan in 1883/4, where they allied themselves with the forces of the Mahdi. As well as being a work of artistic merit, the watercolour, Edmond O'Donovan as an Orientalist (lot 49), is thus an important political painting.O'Kelly maintained family contacts in England where he painted English Peasant Chopping Swedes (opposite, lot 45) c.1887/8. In 1895, he left for the US from but returned regularly to France for the summers. Here he painted the Brittany paintings presented in this sale (see lots: 46,47, 51 & 52) in the early years of the twentieth century. And in 1897, he came back to Ireland in an (unsuccessful) attempt to offer himself as a candidate for election as MP for South Roscommon. In New York he executed a number of portraits of prominent Irish-American politicians, painted views of the city, as well as traveling around the art colonies of America, resulting in many landscape studies of Maine. He returned to Ireland again in 1926, aged seventy-three, still pressing his case for the establishment of a national school of painting. There followed a final sojourn in Brittany, before he returned to America where he died in 1936. Professor Emeritus Niamh O'SullivanFebruary 2013Aloysius O'Kelly exhibited at the Royal Academy, Royal Society of British Artists, Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours and Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, London; Walker Gallery Liverpool; Manchester City Art Gallery; Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin; National Academy of Design, Water Color Club (as a member), American Watercolor Society, and Society of American Artists, New York; Art Institute Chicago; Corcoran Gallery, Washington; Boston Art Club; and at the Paris Salon.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


FISHING BOATS AT CONCARNEAU, FRANCE
FISHING BOATS AT CONCARNEAU, FRANCE
Aloysius C. O’Kelly (1853-1936)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 46

Published Estimate: €2000-3000

Price Realised: €2600

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 9 by 12in., 22.5 by 30cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Aloysius O'Kelly (1853-1936) was born in Dublin as Aloysius Kelly, and immigrated to London in 1861, where he adopted the prefix O'. O'Kelly belonged to a Fenian family. His older brothers, James, Charles and Stephen, were all Fenians, and sculptors (trained by their uncle, John Lawlor, the well-known Irish sculptor in London). O'Kelly lived a life of art and sedition, operating as a painter and activist in Ireland, Britain, France and the United States, as well as in outposts of the empire, such as Sudan and Egypt. His connections to the shadowy world of Irish republican politics permeated his work. Aloysius was closest to James, who was instrumental in building up the Irish Republican Brotherhood in Britain, was active in the Land League, was elected Member of Parliament for Roscommon in 1880 and a key figure in securing Charles Stewart Parnell's agreement for the New Departure. The most radical Irish artist of his era, O'Kelly was prolific and eclectic: Realist in Ireland, Naturalist in France and Orientalist in North Africa, forging all the time new connections between art and anti-colonial politics.O'Kelly was accepted by the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1874, to the studio of Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904), a not inconsequential achievement. He also studied with the portraitist, Joseph-Florentin-Léon Bonnat (1833-1922). He was one of the first Irish artists to go to Brittany, to Pont-Aven, and later Corncarneau. There he mixed with the American colony blending academic, realist and plein-air elements into an innovative mode of rural Naturalism. From France, O'Kelly returned to Ireland in the early 1880s, as 'Special Artist' to The Illustrated London News, giving visual expression to the harsh realities of Irish rural life. Here the Freeman's Journal declared him 'the most important of modern artists', and of 'exceptionally high rank' (2 June 1888). His Mass in a Connemara Cabin (National Gallery of Ireland, 1883) had the distinction of being the first painting of an Irish subject ever exhibited in the Paris Salon. In North Africa, O'Kelly painted many typical scenes, but tended to avoid the emblems of Orientalism, scenes of extremism and characterisations of incompetence that might justify colonial domination. His North African and Middle Eastern paintings reveal a predominantly ethnographic interest. His adoption of the name Oakley in Cairo also points to political activism, leading to a dangerous adventure in which he and his brother, James, followed their friend, Edmond O'Donovan, the Fenian and internationally renowned journalist, to Sudan in 1883/4, where they allied themselves with the forces of the Mahdi. As well as being a work of artistic merit, the watercolour, Edmond O'Donovan as an Orientalist (lot 49), is thus an important political painting.O'Kelly maintained family contacts in England where he painted English Peasant Chopping Swedes (opposite, lot 45) c.1887/8. In 1895, he left for the US from but returned regularly to France for the summers. Here he painted the Brittany paintings presented in this sale (see lots: 46,47, 51 & 52) in the early years of the twentieth century. And in 1897, he came back to Ireland in an (unsuccessful) attempt to offer himself as a candidate for election as MP for South Roscommon. In New York he executed a number of portraits of prominent Irish-American politicians, painted views of the city, as well as traveling around the art colonies of America, resulting in many landscape studies of Maine. He returned to Ireland again in 1926, aged seventy-three, still pressing his case for the establishment of a national school of painting. There followed a final sojourn in Brittany, before he returned to America where he died in 1936. Professor Emeritus Niamh O'SullivanFebruary 2013Aloysius O'Kelly exhibited at the Royal Academy, Royal Society of British Artists, Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours and Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, London; Walker Gallery Liverpool; Manchester City Art Gallery; Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin; National Academy of Design, Water Color Club (as a member), American Watercolor Society, and Society of American Artists, New York; Art Institute Chicago; Corcoran Gallery, Washington; Boston Art Club; and at the Paris Salon.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


ON THE BEACH CONCARNEAU, FRANCE
ON THE BEACH CONCARNEAU, FRANCE
Aloysius C. O’Kelly (1853-1936)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 47

Published Estimate: €2000-3000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower left; with title inscribed faintly in the artist's hand on reverse
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 9 by 13in., 22.5 by 32.5cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Aloysius O'Kelly (1853-1936) was born in Dublin as Aloysius Kelly, and immigrated to London in 1861, where he adopted the prefix O'. O'Kelly belonged to a Fenian family. His older brothers, James, Charles and Stephen, were all Fenians, and sculptors (trained by their uncle, John Lawlor, the well-known Irish sculptor in London). O'Kelly lived a life of art and sedition, operating as a painter and activist in Ireland, Britain, France and the United States, as well as in outposts of the empire, such as Sudan and Egypt. His connections to the shadowy world of Irish republican politics permeated his work. Aloysius was closest to James, who was instrumental in building up the Irish Republican Brotherhood in Britain, was active in the Land League, was elected Member of Parliament for Roscommon in 1880 and a key figure in securing Charles Stewart Parnell's agreement for the New Departure. The most radical Irish artist of his era, O'Kelly was prolific and eclectic: Realist in Ireland, Naturalist in France and Orientalist in North Africa, forging all the time new connections between art and anti-colonial politics.O'Kelly was accepted by the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1874, to the studio of Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904), a not inconsequential achievement. He also studied with the portraitist, Joseph-Florentin-Léon Bonnat (1833-1922). He was one of the first Irish artists to go to Brittany, to Pont-Aven, and later Corncarneau. There he mixed with the American colony blending academic, realist and plein-air elements into an innovative mode of rural Naturalism. From France, O'Kelly returned to Ireland in the early 1880s, as 'Special Artist' to The Illustrated London News, giving visual expression to the harsh realities of Irish rural life. Here the Freeman's Journal declared him 'the most important of modern artists', and of 'exceptionally high rank' (2 June 1888). His Mass in a Connemara Cabin (National Gallery of Ireland, 1883) had the distinction of being the first painting of an Irish subject ever exhibited in the Paris Salon. In North Africa, O'Kelly painted many typical scenes, but tended to avoid the emblems of Orientalism, scenes of extremism and characterisations of incompetence that might justify colonial domination. His North African and Middle Eastern paintings reveal a predominantly ethnographic interest. His adoption of the name Oakley in Cairo also points to political activism, leading to a dangerous adventure in which he and his brother, James, followed their friend, Edmond O'Donovan, the Fenian and internationally renowned journalist, to Sudan in 1883/4, where they allied themselves with the forces of the Mahdi. As well as being a work of artistic merit, the watercolour, Edmond O'Donovan as an Orientalist (lot 49), is thus an important political painting.O'Kelly maintained family contacts in England where he painted English Peasant Chopping Swedes (opposite, lot 45) c.1887/8. In 1895, he left for the US from but returned regularly to France for the summers. Here he painted the Brittany paintings presented in this sale (see lots: 46,47, 51 & 52) in the early years of the twentieth century. And in 1897, he came back to Ireland in an (unsuccessful) attempt to offer himself as a candidate for election as MP for South Roscommon. In New York he executed a number of portraits of prominent Irish-American politicians, painted views of the city, as well as traveling around the art colonies of America, resulting in many landscape studies of Maine. He returned to Ireland again in 1926, aged seventy-three, still pressing his case for the establishment of a national school of painting. There followed a final sojourn in Brittany, before he returned to America where he died in 1936. Professor Emeritus Niamh O'SullivanFebruary 2013Aloysius O'Kelly exhibited at the Royal Academy, Royal Society of British Artists, Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours and Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, London; Walker Gallery Liverpool; Manchester City Art Gallery; Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin; National Academy of Design, Water Color Club (as a member), American Watercolor Society, and Society of American Artists, New York; Art Institute Chicago; Corcoran Gallery, Washington; Boston Art Club; and at the Paris Salon.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


TREES
TREES
Aloysius C. O’Kelly (1853-1936)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 48

Published Estimate: €2000-3000

Price Realised: €1900

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 12.5 by 9in., 31.25 by 22.5cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Aloysius O'Kelly (1853-1936) was born in Dublin as Aloysius Kelly, and immigrated to London in 1861, where he adopted the prefix O'. O'Kelly belonged to a Fenian family. His older brothers, James, Charles and Stephen, were all Fenians, and sculptors (trained by their uncle, John Lawlor, the well-known Irish sculptor in London). O'Kelly lived a life of art and sedition, operating as a painter and activist in Ireland, Britain, France and the United States, as well as in outposts of the empire, such as Sudan and Egypt. His connections to the shadowy world of Irish republican politics permeated his work. Aloysius was closest to James, who was instrumental in building up the Irish Republican Brotherhood in Britain, was active in the Land League, was elected Member of Parliament for Roscommon in 1880 and a key figure in securing Charles Stewart Parnell's agreement for the New Departure. The most radical Irish artist of his era, O'Kelly was prolific and eclectic: Realist in Ireland, Naturalist in France and Orientalist in North Africa, forging all the time new connections between art and anti-colonial politics.O'Kelly was accepted by the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1874, to the studio of Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904), a not inconsequential achievement. He also studied with the portraitist, Joseph-Florentin-Léon Bonnat (1833-1922). He was one of the first Irish artists to go to Brittany, to Pont-Aven, and later Corncarneau. There he mixed with the American colony blending academic, realist and plein-air elements into an innovative mode of rural Naturalism. From France, O'Kelly returned to Ireland in the early 1880s, as 'Special Artist' to The Illustrated London News, giving visual expression to the harsh realities of Irish rural life. Here the Freeman's Journal declared him 'the most important of modern artists', and of 'exceptionally high rank' (2 June 1888). His Mass in a Connemara Cabin (National Gallery of Ireland, 1883) had the distinction of being the first painting of an Irish subject ever exhibited in the Paris Salon. In North Africa, O'Kelly painted many typical scenes, but tended to avoid the emblems of Orientalism, scenes of extremism and characterisations of incompetence that might justify colonial domination. His North African and Middle Eastern paintings reveal a predominantly ethnographic interest. His adoption of the name Oakley in Cairo also points to political activism, leading to a dangerous adventure in which he and his brother, James, followed their friend, Edmond O'Donovan, the Fenian and internationally renowned journalist, to Sudan in 1883/4, where they allied themselves with the forces of the Mahdi. As well as being a work of artistic merit, the watercolour, Edmond O'Donovan as an Orientalist (lot 49), is thus an important political painting.O'Kelly maintained family contacts in England where he painted English Peasant Chopping Swedes (opposite, lot 45) c.1887/8. In 1895, he left for the US from but returned regularly to France for the summers. Here he painted the Brittany paintings presented in this sale (see lots: 46,47, 51 & 52) in the early years of the twentieth century. And in 1897, he came back to Ireland in an (unsuccessful) attempt to offer himself as a candidate for election as MP for South Roscommon. In New York he executed a number of portraits of prominent Irish-American politicians, painted views of the city, as well as traveling around the art colonies of America, resulting in many landscape studies of Maine. He returned to Ireland again in 1926, aged seventy-three, still pressing his case for the establishment of a national school of painting. There followed a final sojourn in Brittany, before he returned to America where he died in 1936. Professor Emeritus Niamh O'SullivanFebruary 2013Aloysius O'Kelly exhibited at the Royal Academy, Royal Society of British Artists, Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours and Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, London; Walker Gallery Liverpool; Manchester City Art Gallery; Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin; National Academy of Design, Water Color Club (as a member), American Watercolor Society, and Society of American Artists, New York; Art Institute Chicago; Corcoran Gallery, Washington; Boston Art Club; and at the Paris Salon.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


EDMOND O'DONOVAN AS AN ORIENTAL, c.1883-84
EDMOND O'DONOVAN AS AN ORIENTAL, c.1883-84
Aloysius C. O’Kelly (1853-1936)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 49

Published Estimate: €800-1000

Price Realised: €3200

  • Signature: signed lower right; with Hugh Lane exhibition label on reverse
  • Medium: watercolour over pencil heightened with body colour on laid paper
  • Dimensions: 22.25 by 16in., 55.625 by 40cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Exhibited: 'Aloysius O'Kelly, Re-Orientations, Paintings, Politics and Popular Culture', Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Dublin, 25 November 1999 to 30 January 2000
  • Literature: O'Sullivan, Niamh, Aloysius O'Kelly, Re-Orientations, Paintings, Politics and Popular Culture, Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Dublin, 1999, p.72 -73 (full page illustration p.72)
  • A graduate of Belvedere and later Trinity College, Edmond O'Donovan was sworn into the Fenians by O'Donovan Rossa. After a failed uprising in 1867 he fled to Paris. He joined the Foreign Legion at the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian in 1870. Wounded and taken prisoner, he was shipped back to Ireland in May 1871. When he was home in Ireland he spent his time trying to revitalise the Fenian movement while also reporting on the Balkan War for the Daily News. His time as a correspondent came to a tragic end when he disappeared in the Sudan during the Mahdi uprising in 1883.Aloysius O'Kelly (1853-1936) was born in Dublin as Aloysius Kelly, and immigrated to London in 1861, where he adopted the prefix O'. O'Kelly belonged to a Fenian family. His older brothers, James, Charles and Stephen, were all Fenians, and sculptors (trained by their uncle, John Lawlor, the well-known Irish sculptor in London). O'Kelly lived a life of art and sedition, operating as a painter and activist in Ireland, Britain, France and the United States, as well as in outposts of the empire, such as Sudan and Egypt. His connections to the shadowy world of Irish republican politics permeated his work. Aloysius was closest to James, who was instrumental in building up the Irish Republican Brotherhood in Britain, was active in the Land League, was elected Member of Parliament for Roscommon in 1880 and a key figure in securing Charles Stewart Parnell's agreement for the New Departure. The most radical Irish artist of his era, O'Kelly was prolific and eclectic: Realist in Ireland, Naturalist in France and Orientalist in North Africa, forging all the time new connections between art and anti-colonial politics.O'Kelly was accepted by the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1874, to the studio of Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904), a not inconsequential achievement. He also studied with the portraitist, Joseph-Florentin-Léon Bonnat (1833-1922). He was one of the first Irish artists to go to Brittany, to Pont-Aven, and later Corncarneau. There he mixed with the American colony blending academic, realist and plein-air elements into an innovative mode of rural Naturalism. From France, O'Kelly returned to Ireland in the early 1880s, as 'Special Artist' to The Illustrated London News, giving visual expression to the harsh realities of Irish rural life. Here the Freeman's Journal declared him 'the most important of modern artists', and of 'exceptionally high rank' (2 June 1888). His Mass in a Connemara Cabin (National Gallery of Ireland, 1883) had the distinction of being the first painting of an Irish subject ever exhibited in the Paris Salon. In North Africa, O'Kelly painted many typical scenes, but tended to avoid the emblems of Orientalism, scenes of extremism and characterisations of incompetence that might justify colonial domination. His North African and Middle Eastern paintings reveal a predominantly ethnographic interest. His adoption of the name Oakley in Cairo also points to political activism, leading to a dangerous adventure in which he and his brother, James, followed their friend, Edmond O'Donovan, the Fenian and internationally renowned journalist, to Sudan in 1883/4, where they allied themselves with the forces of the Mahdi. As well as being a work of artistic merit, the watercolour, Edmond O'Donovan as an Orientalist (lot 49), is thus an important political painting.O'Kelly maintained family contacts in England where he painted English Peasant Chopping Swedes (opposite, lot 45) c.1887/8. In 1895, he left for the US from but returned regularly to France for the summers. Here he painted the Brittany paintings presented in this sale (see lots: 46,47, 51 & 52) in the early years of the twentieth century. And in 1897, he came back to Ireland in an (unsuccessful) attempt to offer himself as a candidate for election as MP for South Roscommon. In New York he executed a number of portraits of prominent Irish-American politicians, painted views of the city, as well as traveling around the art colonies of America, resulting in many landscape studies of Maine. He returned to Ireland again in 1926, aged seventy-three, still pressing his case for the establishment of a national school of painting. There followed a final sojourn in Brittany, before he returned to America where he died in 1936. Professor Emeritus Niamh O'SullivanFebruary 2013Aloysius O'Kelly exhibited at the Royal Academy, Royal Society of British Artists, Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours and Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, London; Walker Gallery Liverpool; Manchester City Art Gallery; Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin; National Academy of Design, Water Color Club (as a member), American Watercolor Society, and Society of American Artists, New York; Art Institute Chicago; Corcoran Gallery, Washington; Boston Art Club; and at the Paris Salon.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


RIVER AND TREES
RIVER AND TREES
Aloysius C. O’Kelly (1853-1936)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 50

Published Estimate: €2000-3000

Price Realised: €2000

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on board
  • Dimensions: 10 by 13in., 25 by 32.5cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Aloysius O'Kelly (1853-1936) was born in Dublin as Aloysius Kelly, and immigrated to London in 1861, where he adopted the prefix O'. O'Kelly belonged to a Fenian family. His older brothers, James, Charles and Stephen, were all Fenians, and sculptors (trained by their uncle, John Lawlor, the well-known Irish sculptor in London). O'Kelly lived a life of art and sedition, operating as a painter and activist in Ireland, Britain, France and the United States, as well as in outposts of the empire, such as Sudan and Egypt. His connections to the shadowy world of Irish republican politics permeated his work. Aloysius was closest to James, who was instrumental in building up the Irish Republican Brotherhood in Britain, was active in the Land League, was elected Member of Parliament for Roscommon in 1880 and a key figure in securing Charles Stewart Parnell's agreement for the New Departure. The most radical Irish artist of his era, O'Kelly was prolific and eclectic: Realist in Ireland, Naturalist in France and Orientalist in North Africa, forging all the time new connections between art and anti-colonial politics.O'Kelly was accepted by the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1874, to the studio of Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904), a not inconsequential achievement. He also studied with the portraitist, Joseph-Florentin-Léon Bonnat (1833-1922). He was one of the first Irish artists to go to Brittany, to Pont-Aven, and later Corncarneau. There he mixed with the American colony blending academic, realist and plein-air elements into an innovative mode of rural Naturalism. From France, O'Kelly returned to Ireland in the early 1880s, as 'Special Artist' to The Illustrated London News, giving visual expression to the harsh realities of Irish rural life. Here the Freeman's Journal declared him 'the most important of modern artists', and of 'exceptionally high rank' (2 June 1888). His Mass in a Connemara Cabin (National Gallery of Ireland, 1883) had the distinction of being the first painting of an Irish subject ever exhibited in the Paris Salon. In North Africa, O'Kelly painted many typical scenes, but tended to avoid the emblems of Orientalism, scenes of extremism and characterisations of incompetence that might justify colonial domination. His North African and Middle Eastern paintings reveal a predominantly ethnographic interest. His adoption of the name Oakley in Cairo also points to political activism, leading to a dangerous adventure in which he and his brother, James, followed their friend, Edmond O'Donovan, the Fenian and internationally renowned journalist, to Sudan in 1883/4, where they allied themselves with the forces of the Mahdi. As well as being a work of artistic merit, the watercolour, Edmond O'Donovan as an Orientalist (lot 49), is thus an important political painting.O'Kelly maintained family contacts in England where he painted English Peasant Chopping Swedes (opposite, lot 45) c.1887/8. In 1895, he left for the US from but returned regularly to France for the summers. Here he painted the Brittany paintings presented in this sale (see lots: 46,47, 51 & 52) in the early years of the twentieth century. And in 1897, he came back to Ireland in an (unsuccessful) attempt to offer himself as a candidate for election as MP for South Roscommon. In New York he executed a number of portraits of prominent Irish-American politicians, painted views of the city, as well as traveling around the art colonies of America, resulting in many landscape studies of Maine. He returned to Ireland again in 1926, aged seventy-three, still pressing his case for the establishment of a national school of painting. There followed a final sojourn in Brittany, before he returned to America where he died in 1936. Professor Emeritus Niamh O'SullivanFebruary 2013Aloysius O'Kelly exhibited at the Royal Academy, Royal Society of British Artists, Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours and Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, London; Walker Gallery Liverpool; Manchester City Art Gallery; Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin; National Academy of Design, Water Color Club (as a member), American Watercolor Society, and Society of American Artists, New York; Art Institute Chicago; Corcoran Gallery, Washington; Boston Art Club; and at the Paris Salon.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


BOATS OUTSIDE CONCARNEAU, FRANCE
BOATS OUTSIDE CONCARNEAU, FRANCE
Aloysius C. O’Kelly (1853-1936)

Auction Date / Lot No.: 4 March 2013 / 51

Published Estimate: €2000-3000

Price Realised: €0

  • Signature: signed lower right
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Dimensions: 9 by 12in., 22.5 by 30cm.
  • Provenance: The Collection of Mervyn & Pat Solomon
  • Aloysius O'Kelly (1853-1936) was born in Dublin as Aloysius Kelly, and immigrated to London in 1861, where he adopted the prefix O'. O'Kelly belonged to a Fenian family. His older brothers, James, Charles and Stephen, were all Fenians, and sculptors (trained by their uncle, John Lawlor, the well-known Irish sculptor in London). O'Kelly lived a life of art and sedition, operating as a painter and activist in Ireland, Britain, France and the United States, as well as in outposts of the empire, such as Sudan and Egypt. His connections to the shadowy world of Irish republican politics permeated his work. Aloysius was closest to James, who was instrumental in building up the Irish Republican Brotherhood in Britain, was active in the Land League, was elected Member of Parliament for Roscommon in 1880 and a key figure in securing Charles Stewart Parnell's agreement for the New Departure. The most radical Irish artist of his era, O'Kelly was prolific and eclectic: Realist in Ireland, Naturalist in France and Orientalist in North Africa, forging all the time new connections between art and anti-colonial politics.O'Kelly was accepted by the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1874, to the studio of Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904), a not inconsequential achievement. He also studied with the portraitist, Joseph-Florentin-Léon Bonnat (1833-1922). He was one of the first Irish artists to go to Brittany, to Pont-Aven, and later Corncarneau. There he mixed with the American colony blending academic, realist and plein-air elements into an innovative mode of rural Naturalism. From France, O'Kelly returned to Ireland in the early 1880s, as 'Special Artist' to The Illustrated London News, giving visual expression to the harsh realities of Irish rural life. Here the Freeman's Journal declared him 'the most important of modern artists', and of 'exceptionally high rank' (2 June 1888). His Mass in a Connemara Cabin (National Gallery of Ireland, 1883) had the distinction of being the first painting of an Irish subject ever exhibited in the Paris Salon. In North Africa, O'Kelly painted many typical scenes, but tended to avoid the emblems of Orientalism, scenes of extremism and characterisations of incompetence that might justify colonial domination. His North African and Middle Eastern paintings reveal a predominantly ethnographic interest. His adoption of the name Oakley in Cairo also points to political activism, leading to a dangerous adventure in which he and his brother, James, followed their friend, Edmond O'Donovan, the Fenian and internationally renowned journalist, to Sudan in 1883/4, where they allied themselves with the forces of the Mahdi. As well as being a work of artistic merit, the watercolour, Edmond O'Donovan as an Orientalist (lot 49), is thus an important political painting.O'Kelly maintained family contacts in England where he painted English Peasant Chopping Swedes (opposite, lot 45) c.1887/8. In 1895, he left for the US from but returned regularly to France for the summers. Here he painted the Brittany paintings presented in this sale (see lots: 46,47, 51 & 52) in the early years of the twentieth century. And in 1897, he came back to Ireland in an (unsuccessful) attempt to offer himself as a candidate for election as MP for South Roscommon. In New York he executed a number of portraits of prominent Irish-American politicians, painted views of the city, as well as traveling around the art colonies of America, resulting in many landscape studies of Maine. He returned to Ireland again in 1926, aged seventy-three, still pressing his case for the establishment of a national school of painting. There followed a final sojourn in Brittany, before he returned to America where he died in 1936. Professor Emeritus Niamh O'SullivanFebruary 2013Aloysius O'Kelly exhibited at the Royal Academy, Royal Society of British Artists, Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours and Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, London; Walker Gallery Liverpool; Manchester City Art Gallery; Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin; National Academy of Design, Water Color Club (as a member), American Watercolor Society, and Society of American Artists, New York; Art Institute Chicago; Corcoran Gallery, Washington; Boston Art Club; and at the Paris Salon.

  • Have one to sell? Interested in Similar Items?


  Records 1 to 50 of 245     Next 20 results Last results

FREE VALUATIONS: DUBLIN: Informal and confidential advice and valuations for prospective sellers given by appointment at our galleries, 38 Molesworth Street, Dublin 2; Monday to Friday,10am to 5pm. .
ELSEWHERE: send images and details to info@whytes.ie for a free appraisal and advice on selling. We also travel throughout Ireland and Great Britain, and occasionally to the US and elsewhere, to appraise large collections or valuable single items. 
CLICK HERE FOR GUIDE TO SELLING AT WHYTE'S, or watch our video here.

Whyte & Sons Auctioneers Ltd., 38 Molesworth Street, Dublin D02 KF80, Ireland. Tel: +353 (0)1 676 2888 Email: info@whytes.ie
Licensed to conduct auctions by The Property Services Regulatory Authority of Ireland. Licence No. 001759.